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Omid Shokri Kalehsar

Omid Shokri Kalehsar is a Washington-based Senior Energy Security Analyst, currently serving as a Visiting Research Scholar in the Center for Energy Science and Policy (CESP) and the Schar, School of Policy and Government at George Mason University. Omid is a PhD Candidate in International Relations at Yalova University, Turkey.  

His primary research interest lies in Energy diplomacy, U.S. energy policy, geopolitics of energy, Iran-Turkey relations and Iran-Russia relations. He has ten years of extensive professional experience in global energy market studies, energy security and geopolitical risk. He has published articles in various academic journals including Energy and Environment, Middle East Policy, National Interest, Oil and Gas Journal and appeared on the various media outlets, including TRTWorld, Voice of America, BBC Persian, Sputnik News, Iran Int TV, and several others.Follow him at @ushukrik / uskenergy.com (USA)

 

Expert materials

Turkey and China One Road One Belt Project

Turkey and China One Road One Belt Project

Turkey and the Modern Silk Road Project is an important initiative in terms of growth and development of strategic partnership and political relations with China.
Iran’s Interests in China’s One Belt One Road Policy

Iran’s Interests in China’s One Belt One Road Policy

With its massive oil and gas resources and its presence in the Hartland Energy project, Iran is in an excellent geographical location to take advantage of China’s Silk Road project’s benefits.
The Future of Turkey-Russia Relations Post Shipments S-400 Missile System

The Future of Turkey-Russia Relations Post Shipments S-400 Missile System

Turkey is one of the countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and Washington says the entry of the S-400 system into the NATO defense net can reveal the weaknesses of the parties to the treaty
The Strategic Importance of the Strait of Hormuz and Global Energy Security

The Strategic Importance of the Strait of Hormuz and Global Energy Security

The principle governing the world oil market is, simply put, supply and demand.
US-Saudi Energy Relations

US-Saudi Energy Relations

In 2017, Saudi Arabia, following Russia, Iran and Qatar, had the fourth-largest natural gas reserves in the world
Tanker Insurance Cancellations threaten Iranian energy sector

Tanker Insurance Cancellations threaten Iranian energy sector

The US’ withdrawal from the JCPOA and declaration of a new set of sanctions has been hard to swallow for those planning Iran’s energy sector, as they had been relying on the deal as a means of revivifying Iran’s oil and gas production capacity
The Challenges and Opportunities of Iranian LNG Projects

The Challenges and Opportunities of Iranian LNG Projects

Over the past few decades, the share of natural gas in the global fuel basket has grown considerably. All predictions point to gas becoming the largest source of energy in the world, reaching over 28% by 2035. At present, countries such as US, Russia, Australia have made huge investments aiming to take a higher share of the LNG market.
Turkey’s Renewable Energy Potential

Turkey’s Renewable Energy Potential

As a country with a strong dependence on oil and gas imports, Turkey is pursuing a developmental strategy for domestic resources which includes a renewable energy agenda alongside increases in nuclear and coal facilities. Turkey’s growing energy demand make a reliable supply of multiple resource streams a necessity.
Sino-Iranian Energy Relations in light of new sanctions

Sino-Iranian Energy Relations in light of new sanctions

Energy, mainly from oil exports, is one the main foundations on which Sino-Iranian relations are built. China’s growing economy needs energy from reliable sources, and Iran’s huge oil and natural gas reserves go a long way towards covering the surplus in demand. By 2017, the bilateral volume of trade amounted to around $37.2 billion – massively in China’s favor.
LNG and Turkey’s Energy Security

LNG and Turkey’s Energy Security

The shale gas revolution had provided the US with an opportunity not only to become energy efficient, but also a natural gas exporter. US interests in energy exports hinges on boosting relations with neighbors and allies. Turkey’s growing economy and equally increasing energy demands make it a good candidate for US liquified natural gase (LNG) supplies. At present, Turkey imports most of its natural gas from Russia, Iran and Azerbaijan.
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